Pupils’ Beliefs in Cultural Interpretations of ’Heat’ associated with Anger: A Comparative Study of Ten Ethnic Communities in Kenya

Mark I. O. Okere, Fred N. Keraro, Zephania Anditi


APA 6th edition
Okere, M.I.O., Keraro, F.N., & Anditi, Z. (2012). Pupils’ Beliefs in Cultural Interpretations of ’Heat’ associated with Anger: A Comparative Study of Ten Ethnic Communities in Kenya. European Journal of Educational Research, 1(2), 143-154. doi:10.12973/eu-jer.1.2.143

Harvard
Okere M.I.O., Keraro F.N., and Anditi Z. 2012 'Pupils’ Beliefs in Cultural Interpretations of ’Heat’ associated with Anger: A Comparative Study of Ten Ethnic Communities in Kenya', European Journal of Educational Research , vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 143-154. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.12973/eu-jer.1.2.143

Chicago 16th edition
Okere, Mark I. O. , Keraro, Fred N. and Anditi, Zephania . "Pupils’ Beliefs in Cultural Interpretations of ’Heat’ associated with Anger: A Comparative Study of Ten Ethnic Communities in Kenya". (2012)European Journal of Educational Research 1, no. 2(2012): 143-154. doi:10.12973/eu-jer.1.2.143

Abstract

This study investigated the extent to which primary and secondary school pupils believe in cultural interpretations of the physical phenomenon of ‘heat’ associated with anger and the influence of education level, ethnic communities and gender on cultural beliefs. Cross-sectional survey research design was used. The target population was Standard Seven, Form one and Form Three pupils in ten districts selected from Nyanza, Rift Valley, Central, Eastern and Coast Provinces in Kenya. The ten districts were selected purposively to represent 10 different ethnic communities from the five provinces. A total of 2837 secondary and 625 primary school pupils participated. The pupils were drawn from 15 primary and 31 secondary schools. A questionnaire was used to gather information from pupils. Some of the results obtained give statistically significant relationship between pupils’ beliefs in cultural interpretations of scientific phenomenon of heat associated with anger and the communities where they come from. This implies that such beliefs are confined to specific communities studied. There appears to be no significant association between pupils’ beliefs in cultural interpretations of the scientific phenomenon of heat and level of education in some of the communities. The implication is that education reduces beliefs in cultural interpretations in such communities but does not eradicate such beliefs.

Keywords: Science, culture, beliefs