Research Article
Examining an English as a Foreign Language Teacher Education Program (EFLTEP)’s Curriculum: A Case Study in an Indonesian University

Urip Sulistiyo , Mujiyono Wiryotinoyo, Retno Wulan


APA 7th edition
Sulistiyo, U., Wiryotinoyo, M., & Wulan, R. (2019). Examining An English As A Foreign Language Teacher Education Program (EFLTEP)’s Curriculum: A Case Study In An Indonesian University. European Journal of Educational Research, 8(4), 1323-1333. https://doi.org/10.12973/eu-jer.8.4.1323

Harvard
Sulistiyo U., Wiryotinoyo M., and Wulan R. 2019 'Examining An English As A Foreign Language Teacher Education Program (EFLTEP)’s Curriculum: A Case Study In An Indonesian University', European Journal of Educational Research, 8(4), pp. 1323-1333.
Chicago 16th edition
Sulistiyo Urip, Wiryotinoyo Mujiyono, and Wulan Retno. "Examining An English As A Foreign Language Teacher Education Program (EFLTEP)’s Curriculum: A Case Study In An Indonesian University," European Journal of Educational Research 8, no. 4 (2019): 1323-1333. https://doi.org/10.12973/eu-jer.8.4.1323

Abstract

This study aims to examine the English as A Foreign Language Teacher Education Program (EFLTEP)‘s curriculum of one state university in Jambi Province, Indonesia. This research employed a qualitative research design with case study involving 8 participants comprising of 4 beginner teachers and 4 teacher educators. This study used document analysis and interview as its instruments of data collection. The data revealed that beginner teachers perceived they need more practical aspects of pedagogical-related courses than theoretical aspects of teaching. Furthermore, a number of courses were overlapped and need to be redesigned, teaching and learning in large classes seems to be a crucial barrier to the effective implementation of the curriculum in the classroom, and the duration of the EFLTEP to completion is considerably longer than other pre-service teacher education programs. Based on the research findings, several recommendations have been provided. A curriculum should be able to balance the theory and pedagogical skill practice. Teachers, administrative, and other relevant stakeholders should deliberate and design the curriculum together considering other courses or credits to avoid overlapping subjects, eliciting the subjects, and integrated the similar subjects into one would be best choice to optimize the teacher education program, teachers and other stakeholders should allocate much time on Teaching English as Foreign Language (TEFL) practice and classroom management courses. At last, the curriculum should be in line with pre-service teachers’ needs to better prepare them with knowledge and skills for their teaching career in the future.

Keywords: Curriculum, EFL teacher education, pedagogical content knowledge.


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